Sunday, 22 February 2009

Postman's Park (32): Thomas Griffin

Garton Hill & Co were sugar refiners who had moved production from Southampton to Battersea in 1882. Their products included a specialist brewing sugar, Garton's Saccharum, described as fully inverted, free from impurities, and able to 'brew Beer surpassing even Burton Ales in brightness and endurance'. The company would continue (later under the name Manbre & Garton) until taken over by Tate & Lyle in 1976.

In 1899, 21-year-old labourer Thomas Griffin suffered a fatal accident at the refinery. He was working in the hydraulic room when he heard an explosion. It came from a room where his colleague F Briggs worked, and he rushed into the steam shouting 'my mate, my mate'. When he emerged a few minutes later, he was terribly scalded and soon died from his injuries. Awfully, his death was in vain: Briggs had already escaped unhurt.

THOMAS GRIFFIN, FITTERS LABOURER APRIL 12 1899, IN A BOILER EXPLOSION AT A BATTERSEA SUGAR REFINERY WAS FATALLY SCALDED IN RETURNING TO SEARCH FOR HIS MATE.

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4 comments:

Adam said...

Well he certainly came to a sticky end...

CarolineLD said...

Ouch!

Patrick C said...

Where did you get your information surrounding the circumstances of his death?

CarolineLD said...

From contemporary newspaper reports; unfortunately I don't have the references to hand, but from memory it was reported in the local newspaper.

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